“The Wilds and FREE” eBook Giveaway

Wilds_FREE_Promo_CoverTo celebrate the release of StoryBundle’s Weird Western compilation—and IDYLL’s inclusion in that amazing set—I’m now offering a free eBook copy of Book 2 of the Idyll Trilogy (THE WILDS) to anyone who signs up for my email newsletter.

All you have to do is email me at jderrywriter@gmail.com and let me know what eBook format you prefer (MOBI or ePub), and I’ll send it over to you!

So If you’ve just finished reading IDYLL (or you’re considering reading it), I’d love to hear from you and to send you a free copy of THE WILDS. I hope you’ll enjoy finding out what’s next for the Starboards and the Bridges. Here’s a hint: It involves a whole planet’s worth of trouble!

In return, I’ll send you eblasts (never more that biweekly) with updates and concept sketches for the Idyll Trilogy, plus news on my next SFF series. You’ll be the first to get info on the upcoming Book 3 of the trilogy (I’m about halfway through the rough draft) and the first to hear about other deals as well.

This giveaway expires on September 10th, so don’t forget that old bit of settler wisdom: “Quick is merciful!”

Don’t wait, sign up now!

Rum droll, please!

Book 2 of the Idyll Trilogy will drop on June 21! Check out the cover & blurb for THE WILDS!

The Wilds by James DerryWalt and Samuel Starboard. Miriam and Virginia Bridge. Four travelers entered the mysterious City-Ship of Marathon, but only three made it out.

Now our heroes are faced with a new, more existential threat. An invader from Mother Earth has arrived on Idyll—an outlaw psychopath who will use Terran technology to establish himself as the planet’s ultimate creator-destroyer.

And to make matters worse—he’s brought company.

To face this ‘outcaster,’ Marathon’s survivors will fight their way through a demolished starship, under the bowels of their planet, across untamed wilds—and into a stark white desert unlike any they have ever imagined. But will it be enough to save their world from certain doom?

Continuing the story started in 2015’s IDYLL, THE WILDS is jam-packed with plasma-gun shoot-outs, a love triangle that spans an ocean, and ‘Lord of the Flies’-style suspense. If that sounds like your kind of character-driven sci-fi goodness, then you should check it out!

 

 

I Just Read: Fourth of July Creek

Fourth_of_July_CreekThe word ‘forewarned’—does it need to exist? Or is it an example of slapping an unnecessary prefix on a verb that was already functioning quite well on its own? In my opinion, the most annoying example of this is ‘preheat.’ I want to write a letter to Marie Calendar and ask her what’s the difference between preheating an oven and just heating it. Then I’ll end the letter with my patented catchphrase, “If it ain’t broke, don’t prefix it!”

Anyhoo… Be (fore)warned, if you actively avoid stories about abused or neglected children, then you’ll probably want to steer clear of Fourth of July Creek. In my case, I was intrigued by a review of this book in Entertainment Weekly, and decided to check it out despite the depressing premise. The $1.99 price tag was also a big selling point.

The novel tells the story of a social worker, Pete Snow, who gets wrapped up in seditious happenings in the outskirts of Montana in the early 1980s. The book read like a modern Western to me, which was what I was hoping for. The beautiful descriptions of the Montana landscape, and the cast of brink-of-the-law characters helped to contribute to that feel. And the author, Smith Henderson, occasionally sidles in a stream-consciousness-through-choppy-waters style that made me think of a more narrative version of Cormac McCarthy.

Henderson also employs an interesting style while the narrative follows Pete’s daughter, Rachel. Her story unfolds in as a sort of Q&A that she’s having with herself.

“And does (her mother) keep Rachel home now, say for her to cut class and stay home?
Yes.
And do they watch TV all day and go for long drives and was it like they were always just waiting for Rachel to get old enough so they could be friends and tell each other everything?
That’s what her mother says.
And what is the everything Rachel tells, on the porch in the cooling of the evening?
Nothing. Her mother does all the telling.”

Appropriately unsettling, and there’s something about it that gives off a sort of rebellious teenage rhetorical style (navel-gazing, back-talking). Or is this a rendering of an interview that Rachel’s giving to another social worker, explaining how crappy her parents are?

The main character, Pete, is definitely a crappy parent—and a hard protagonist to root for in the traditional sense. He reminded me of George Clooney’s character in The Descendants. I’ve never read that novel, but during the movie adaptation I kept wanting to yell at his character, “Stop galavanting around Hawaii and help your daughters deal with the fact that their mother is brain-dead!” At least Pete’s flaws are obviously and unsympathetically presented, and Pete suffers and learns from his mistakes.

Overall, Fourth of July Creek is a bleak book, but I’m glad I read it. I think it will probably make my Top 5 reads of the year.